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1895 5th Reunion
["Lord Metuchen" helmets]

{Joining the new fad for wearing Class hats, in 1900}

1895 Class Photo

Public Domain - Out of copyright.

Source: Princeton University, The Class of 1895, Record of the Class of ’95 of Princeton University 1895-1900. Edited by the Secretary, Andrew Clerk Imbrie, Number Three, New York, Cooke & Fry,1900. Courtesy HathiTrust.

A year after the Class of '96 had instituted Class hats in 1899, the Class of '95 donned white pith helmets resembling ones then being worn by British troops in the Boer War. Classmates called these their "Lord Metuchen" helmets. The term was a New Jersey-centric pun on the name of Lord Methuen, a senior British commander much in the news back then.

The photo also shows (upper right) two of the "Japanese parasols" that classmates carried in that year's P-rade (somewhat incongruously, since they were already wearing sun helmets . . . ).


The "Class Boy"

1895 "Class Boy"

Public Domain - Out of copyright.

Source: Princeton University, The Class of 1895, Record of the Class of ’95 of Princeton University 1895-1900. Edited by the Secretary, Andrew Clerk Imbrie, Number Three, New York, Cooke & Fry,1900. Courtesy HathiTrust.

In the center of the class photo is a father holding his young son on his lap. This child was 1895's "Class Boy." Class Boy was an official class designation well into the 20th century, at least as late as WWII.

The title signified the first male child born to the first classmate to father one after graduation. The class would officially proclaim him shortly after the class secretary received news of his birth. A Class Boy would frequently be included in the official reunion photo of his father's class.

The Class Boy often got to march (or be carried) at the head of the class in the P-rade, usually wearing full costume. And a sub-teen Class Boy sometimes got to throw out the first pitch at the Yale baseball game.

Tim Tulenko '67